Question: Can Be Or Might Be?

Can we use might for future?

There is no future tense, but might is used for talking about future possibilities: It might rain tomorrow..

How do you use had better in a sentence?

Had better is always followed by a verb in the infinitive without ‘to’: You had better BE on time. You must or should be on time. Had better is ALWAYS formed from the auxiliary verb ‘have’ in the past simple (‘has better’ or ‘will have better’ do not exist!).

When should we use should?

‘Should’ can be used:To express something that is probable. Examples: “John should be here by 2:00 PM.” “He should be bringing Jennifer with him.To ask questions. Examples: “Should we turn left at this street?” … To show obligation, give recommendation or even an opinion. Examples: “You should stop eating fast food.”

Can you vs Will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

Where we use would?

would is the past tense form of will. Because it is a past tense, it is used: to talk about the past. to talk about hypotheses (when we imagine something)

How do you use might have been?

May have been and might have been mean the same thing in American English, and are nearly always interchangeable. These two sentences are equivalent, for example: I may have been taking a shower when you called. I might have been taking a shower when you called.

Could be sentences in English?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.” Examples: Extreme rain could cause the river to flood the city.

Can be or could be usage?

So in these sentences – ‘can’ shows present ability, and ‘could’ shows past ability. This is the first difference between the two words. The second difference is when we want to talk about possibility. To talk about what is possible, we normally use ‘could’ and not ‘can’.

Where we use might be?

We use might when we are not sure about something in the present or future: I might see you tomorrow. It looks nice, but it might be very expensive.

Can could tenses?

Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

How do you use might be in a sentence?

Might sentence examplesIt might have done damage inside. … If you could see a way it might be possible, then it must be possible. … We might have done something to help you. … This might be the most difficult decision she would ever make. … Either situation might be the case. … No one knows what the mother might do.More items…

Can and could sentences examples?

‘can’ and ‘could’They could come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.) … It can be very cold here in winter. (= It is sometimes very cold here in winter.) … That can’t be true. You cannot be serious.It’s ten o’clock. … It could be very cold there in winter. … They know the way here. … She can speak several languages. … I can see you.More items…

Can be or may be?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice. Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense. You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better.